An overview of the design and methods for retrieving high-quality studies for clinical care.

TitleAn overview of the design and methods for retrieving high-quality studies for clinical care.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsWilczynski NL, Morgan D, Haynes BR
Corporate AuthorsHedges Team
JournalBMC medical informatics and decision making
Volume5
Pagination20
Date Published2005
ISSN1472-6947
KeywordsDatabases, Bibliographic; Efficiency; Evaluation Studies as Topic; Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; Medical Subject Headings; MEDLINE; Periodicals as Topic
AbstractBACKGROUND: With the information explosion, the retrieval of the best clinical evidence from large, general purpose, bibliographic databases such as MEDLINE can be difficult. Both researchers conducting systematic reviews and clinicians faced with a patient care question are confronted with the daunting task of searching for the best medical literature in electronic databases. Many have advocated the use of search filters or "hedges" to assist with the searching process. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and methods of a study that set out to develop optimal search strategies for retrieving sound clinical studies of health disorders in large electronics databases. OBJECTIVE: To describe the design and methods of a study that set out to develop optimal search strategies for retrieving sound clinical studies of health disorders in large electronic databases. DESIGN: An analytic survey comparing hand searches of 170 journals in the year 2000 with retrievals from MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for candidate search terms and combinations. The sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of unique search terms and combinations of search terms were calculated. CONCLUSION: A study design modeled after a diagnostic testing procedure with a gold standard (the hand search of the literature) and a test (the search terms) is an effective way of developing, testing, and validating search strategies for use in large electronic databases.
DOI10.1186/1472-6947-5-20
Alternate JournalBMC Med Inform Decis Mak